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Militant Islam Monitor > Articles > American Muslim Anti Discrimination Committee gets 6 ml from Saudi prince who gave 27 ml to "martyrs" fund as AMC sues FBI and JTTT

American Muslim Anti Discrimination Committee gets 6 ml from Saudi prince who gave 27 ml to "martyrs" fund as AMC sues FBI and JTTT

Kamal Nawash- head of FMAT "warmly received "at ADC banquet where Prince Alwaheed pledged funding to Muslim organsations
June 8, 2005

MIM: The Saudi funded American Muslim Anti Discrimination Committee is presently suing the FBI and JTTF for 'spying on political and religious groups: According to the ADC press release:http://www.adc.org/index.php?id=2479 "TheADC Joins ACLU in Lawsuit Asking for Information Release on Possible FBI JTTF Spying on Political and Religious Groups". The suit was announced after the ADC had hosted members of the FBI and other law enforcement agencies at a Town Hall Meeting at which Muslims heckled law enforcement while demanding they make it easier to hire more Muslim agents! According to the ADC account of what was billed "A Town Hall Meeting with the FBI, DHS, and State Attorney's office and focused on "Government recruiting efforts". http://www.adc.org/index.php?id=2479

"...Perhaps the liveliest debate took place over FBI and government recruitment policies, which Khawly argued, tend to make it especially difficult for Arabs to find jobs in federal agencies. Questions from the audience centered on this issue, and FBI representatives acknowledged that they would like to hire more people of Arab descent.

http://www.adc.org/index.php?id=2514

The 'ADC's 25th Year Silver Anniversary Convention a Tremendous Achievement ' was followed by a 'lavish Dinner' at the Saudi Embassy for ADC delegates . A panel the next day featured DHS, FBI and Secret Service members as well as MPAC's Ahmed Younis
"Prince Al Walid also extended his generosity to ADC when he pledged to help ADC purchase a building that will house its National office and a cultural center. " http://www.adc.org/index.php?id=2515

http://www.adc.org/schedule.htm

Featured Keynote Address & ADC Global Achievement Award - HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdul Aziz Alsaud

ADC Lifetime Advocacy Award - Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan

Greetings: Former President Jimmy Carter, Former President George Bush & Former President William Clinton*

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Interesting to note that Nawash was at the event - This was disclosed by Joel Mowbray in his article entitled "Making Modern Muslims". (see excerpt below)

It didn't take long for Kamal Nawash to show that his attendence at the Wahhabist Dar Al Hirjah mosque is not his only continuing connection to Islamism and his Saudi funded cronies at the ADC . Mowbray's claim that Nawash 'rarely discusses Israel' is ludicrous.

The first line of his (auto)biography on the Free Muslims website begins with the sentence "Kamal Nawash began life as a Palestinian refugee' . http://www.freemuslims.org/about/nawash.php

The 'Our Positions' page on the Free Muslims Against Terror website (written by Nawash) is headlined : "Solving the Palestinian/ Israeli Conflict and proclaims: This is the most important policy piece which has been written by the Free Muslims Coalition". http://www.freemuslims.org/issues/israel-palestine.php

The claim that he found a 'suprisingly warm reception from many of the attendees' very likely came from Nawash's own account - Mowbray offers no sources for this information. Even it were true, any claim Muslims make about opposing terrorism as unIslamic is superceded by the fact they do not recognise terrorism and endorse Jihad. The Saudi funded front group for Hamas, CAIR, came out with a disingenuous petition claiming terror is not being part of Islam, failing to mention that for them, Jihad is a form of 'legitimate struggle' which is a religous obligation on all Muslims and therefore is not considred to be terrorism. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A25782-2004May13.html

Mowbray implies that the ADC is now 'becoming moderate' obstensibly because they didn't lynch Nawash at the event. (The heavy presence of FBI and DHS officials would have ensured his security anyway) Mowbray also 'apologises' for Ray Hanania (who is virulently anti semitic) by claiming he is merely 'a hothead' .

Nawash's widely publicised million Muslim March Against Terror only fell short by about 999,990 Muslims, a statistic which Mowbray and Nawash's groupies have spun as being " at least a beginning'. Nawash's bizarre statements in a pre FMAT March interview that 'some people think he was sent by God' and his boast that 'some people see me as the Muslim Martin Luther' have been echoed by Mowbray in his article which portrays Nawash as an intrepid hero instead of a shrewd opportunist who is using the invisible Free Muslims Against Terror as a vehicle for his future political ambitions.

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Excerpts from Making Moderate Muslims by Joel Mowbray http://www.dcexaminer.com/articles/2005/06/06/opinion/politics/84politics07mowbray.txt "...

.However, it was in that crowd - a mix of Muslims and Christians - that maverick Muslim Kamal Nawash (a Palestinian by birth who rarely discusses Israel) found a surprisingly warm reception from many of the attendees.

A former ADC staffer, Nawash has recently become a pariah in the eyes of most American Muslim leaders thanks to his relentless attacks against the radicalism that has seeped into Islam (as it is practiced in America). He is equally incensed at the leaders of major national American Muslim political organizations for their inability to condemn radical Islam even when it is staring them in the face.

Although he was no more than a mere attendee at the ADC conference, Nawash found himself receiving congratulatory handshakes from people who support his confrontational message. Based on the overall currents at the event, it is likely that many of those at the ADC conference supportive of Nawash would not have a particularly benign view of Israel and some probably don't even believe in the right of the Jewish state to exist.

Nawash has caught flak recently for putting a controversial figure on the board of his organization, the Free Muslims Coalition. Ray Hanania, a Chicago columnist, has repeatedly blasted the Jewish state for its policies of "violence" and even called Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon a "Nazi."

Although Hanania can be a hothead, he also is a relentless critic of Islamic terrorism and radical Islam.

But when Nawash and the FMC organized the first-ever Free Muslims Rally Against Terror, several Internet bloggers went after Nawash, including one who ludicrously claimed that Nawash views "Jews/Israelis as the root cause of terrorism."

-------------------------

Article by Stephen Schwartz on ADC (MPAC) and Wahhabism

http://www.frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=13415

ADC convention a success

Excerpted 'highlights'- Kamal Nawash was also at the event

'...Following these meetings was a lavish dinner reception held at the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). ADC warmly thanks the UAE Embassy for welcoming ADC and for the generous hospitality of H.E. Abdullah Al Saboosi. "

-----------------------------------------------------------

The ADC Legal Department also held two panels on Saturday. The first, "Questions and Answers with Your Federal Government," was broadcast live on C-Span, and offered participants the opportunity to ask questions to Federal Government Representatives. The panel was facilitated by ADC Director of Law Enforcement Outreach Program Nawar Shora. Panelists included Stephen Thorne, Community Relations Service, Justice Department; Sebastian Aloot, Office of Special Counsel, Department of Justice; Rebekah Tosado, DHS Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties; Michael Rollince, Special Agent in Charge, Washington Field Office, FBI; Russ Knocke, Director of Public Affairs, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, DHS; Joseph Mansour, Employment Discrimination, Federal Corrections Officer, US Bureau of Prisons; and Walied Shater, U.S. Secret Service.

The "Civil Rights Discussion: Liberty and Security," addressed the delicate, but imperative balance between homeland security and civil rights. Facilitated by ADC's Director of Legal Policy Kareem Shora, panelists included: ACLU Legislative Counsel for National Security Issues Timothy Edgar; President of the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS) Noel Saleh and National Director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council Ahmed Younis.

--------------------------------


At the Saturday Luncheon, Daniel Sutherland, Director of the Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties at DHS, was the guest speaker. In his speech, he reiterated his commitment to protecting the civil rights of all Americans and thanked ADC for its tireless efforts on behalf of, not only Arab-Americans, but also all minority groups.

----------------------------------------------------------

The Sunday Luncheon featured the Rachel Corrie Award Recipient; Brian Avery who movingly spoke about his experience in Palestine after he was shot in the face by Israeli Defense Force soldiers. Rachel Corrie's father and sister Sarah Corrie Simpson ADC Founder James Abourezk also presented an award to Alison Weir of "If Americans Knew."



ADC Conference

http://www.adc.org/index.php?id=2515

Among the highlights this year was the laying of a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier to honor American veterans, and a tour of Capitol Hill with ADC President Hon. Mary Rose Oakar. The Silver Anniversary celebration also featured an impressive list of distinguished speakers throughout the convention. Among these were Hon. John Conyers, former Senator George McGovern, Director of the Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Dan Sutherland, Prince Al Walid Bin Talal Al Saud, and a taped message by Kasey Casem.

Also contributing to the celebration was world-renowned musician Simon Shaheen, and his band Qantara. Additionally, Syrian musical group Kulna Sawa, and Arab-American comedians Maysoon Zayid and Aron Kader performed.

As with previous years, the convention included a multitude of workshops, panel discussions, banquets, and conversations. 41 exhibitors set up display tables at the Convention site and a two-day film festival took place.

FRIDAY, MAY 27

ADC marked the opening of the 25th Year Silver Anniversary Convention, with a speech by HE Clovis Maksoud, former Ambassador of the Arab League. Maksoud kicked off Friday's events with a speech outlining ADC's achievements, goals, and visions.

It was important to ADC to honor past American Veterans during the Convention. In a moving tribute, ADC President Hon. Mary Rose Oakar, Arab American WWII Veteran Nadim Makdisi, West Point Cadet Lee Habib Roberts, Chairman of the ADC Board Safa Rifka, MD, ADC Treasurer George Majeed Khoury, servicemen and observers, laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery.

Attendees also paid homage to public service when they attended a special tour of the US Capitol with Hon. Mary Rose Oakar. While there, they were able to visit the House Floor, an area that is usually restricted to outside visitors.

During the tour, Congressman Nick Rahall (D-WV) met with participants to speak about Congress, and the importance of having Arab-American voices on the Capitol. As emphasized by Hon. Rahall, it is imperative that ADC members establish a rapport with their representatives. This year, Lobby Day will be held in September when much of the legislation in Congress and the Senate is finalized. For more information, contact ADC's Director of Legislative Affairs Christine Gleichert at 202-244-2990.

Following these meetings was a lavish dinner reception held at the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). ADC warmly thanks the UAE Embassy for welcoming ADC and for the generous hospitality of H.E. Abdullah Al Saboosi.

Later that evening at the Convention site Jack Shaheen kicked off the "Evening of Entertainment." Kerri Casey and her famous father Casey Kasem sent their best wishes to ADC via a taped message. Jack Shaheen announced the winners of his Mass Communications Scholarship award. Winners of the $1000 scholarship are: Heidi Saman, Stephanie Abraham Tarik Ahmed Elseewi. Winners of the $500 scholarship are: Stephanie Teebagy, Emman Alleban, Laila Al-Arian. Abraham and Al-Arian were present that evening to receive their awards.

The critically acclaimed musician Simon Shaheen and his band Al-Qantara, gave a much-anticipated performance to a large crowd of fans and attendees. Closing that night's entertainment was comedian Maysoon Zayid, who received boisterous laughter and applause for her politically oriented stand up, followed by the always popular ADC hafle (party).

SATURDAY, MAY 28

On Saturday morning, Vice-Chair of the Progressive Muslim Union Hussein Ibish facilitated the Media Roundtable discussion entitled "Covering the War on Terror," in which fellow journalists outlined the tremendous responsibilities
of investigative reporting, and the discrepancy in the treatment of faulty intelligence from reporters and intelligence officers. The panel was broadcast live on C-Span, and included an array of opinions and personalities from both ends of the journalism spectrum. Among the panelists were: Pulitzer Prize Winner Mike Sallah, Bureau Chief of Al Jazeera Hafez Al-Mirazi, LA Times reporter Ken Silverstein, and American Prospect journalist Jason Vest.

Demonstrating ADC's commitment to being part of the political landscape of the US, Phyllis Bennis, of the Institute for Policy Studies facilitated the "Assessment of US Enterprise in Iraq," panel, that explored aspects of the US presence in Iraq. Joining Bennis were California State University Professor Ayad Al Qazzaz, The American University Professor Edmund Ghareeb, and Colonel W. Patrick Lang, President of Global Resources Group, and also a former Defense Intelligence Officer.

Two other panels focused on US foreign policy and world affairs. One panel was entitled "'Democratization' of the Middle East," featuring HE Clovis Maksoud of The American University and the State Department's David W. Mulenex, Senior Regional Coordinator of the Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI).

The other panel "Syria-Lebanon Crisis: Causes, Risks, and Solutions," was moderated by member of ADC's Board of Directors David Khairallah and joining him were Ambassador Theodore Kattouf currently President of AMIDEAST; University of Michigan Professor Juan Cole; and Trinity University Professor David Lesch.

The ADC Legal Department also held two panels on Saturday. The first, "Questions and Answers with Your Federal Government," was broadcast live on C-Span, and offered participants the opportunity to ask questions to Federal Government Representatives. The panel was facilitated by ADC Director of Law Enforcement Outreach Program Nawar Shora. Panelists included Stephen Thorne, Community Relations Service, Justice Department; Sebastian Aloot, Office of Special Counsel, Department of Justice; Rebekah Tosado, DHS Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties; Michael Rollince, Special Agent in Charge, Washington Field Office, FBI; Russ Knocke, Director of Public Affairs, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, DHS; Joseph Mansour, Employment Discrimination, Federal Corrections Officer, US Bureau of Prisons; and Walied Shater, U.S. Secret Service.

The "Civil Rights Discussion: Liberty and Security," addressed the delicate, but imperative balance between homeland security and civil rights. Facilitated by ADC's Director of Legal Policy Kareem Shora, panelists included: ACLU Legislative Counsel for National Security Issues Timothy Edgar; President of the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS) Noel Saleh and National Director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council Ahmed Younis.

Among the other intriguing panels that took place on Saturday was the "Arab-American Women: Making a Difference." The Arab American Women's panel was moderated by ADC Michigan Deputy Director Rana Abbas-Chami, and she was joined by the Executive Director of the Arab American Institute Foundation Helen Samhan; member of ADC's Board of Directors Linda Mansour-Ismail; and author Samar Jarrah. The panel addressed the contributions of women here in the US and elsewhere.

Once again, the "Growing Up Arab American" panel was highly anticipated and well attended. ADC's Communications Coordinator Siwar Bandar moderated the panel, and panelists included: Policy Analyst at the Arab American Institute Rebecca Abou-Chedid; Bobby Ina; Tarek Ismail; and Noor Najeeb.

In keeping with the theme of social challenges, ADC also provided a panel on Academic Freedom addressing the issue of open and positive academic debate on campuses. Moderated by ADC's Legislative Director Christine Gleichert; panelists included Michael Hudson of Georgetown University; and Issa Mikel.

At the Saturday Luncheon, Daniel Sutherland, Director of the Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties at DHS, was the guest speaker. In his speech, he reiterated his commitment to protecting the civil rights of all Americans and thanked ADC for its tireless efforts on behalf of, not only Arab-Americans, but also all minority groups.

Additionally, there was a tribute to Laura Murphy, retiring Director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) for her years of dedicated service to protecting civil rights and liberties. Also honored at the Luncheon were Judge George Caram Steeh, Assistant Attorney General Alex Acosta, and Acting Director of the ACLU Gregory Nojeim, among others.

Later that evening, at the Anniversary Gala the keynote speaker was Prince Al Walid bin Talal Al Saud, recipient of ADC's Global Achievement Award. Also receiving awards were, Mike Sallah, Sheikh Walied Al Ibrahim, Joseph R. Haiek, Al Jazeera, the Maloof family, William Hanna, Fawaz Ismail, Naseeb Saliba, Hon. Nick Rahall, and Hon. John Conyers, who also gave remarks during the Gala.

The Banquet hall was filled to the capacity on Saturday night when Prince Al Walid bin Talal Al Saud gave the keynote address. The speech was received with thundering applause and was covered on C-Span and rebroadcast multiple times.

In his speech the Prince outlined the importance of the Arab-American community as a bridge between the Arab world and the West. He said, "Needless to say, we in the Arab World derive a good measure of pride and reflected glory, for your accomplishment provide a corrective antidote to what is often said about us abroad. And they deepen the recognition that success can indeed be realized in the Arab World if only we are to create a suitable setting to foster and unleash the abundant talent that we have at home." He later added, "The more I reflect on the state of relations between the United States and the Arab and Muslim worlds, the more I am convinced that what unite us is infinitely greater than the elements that divide. Many of the fundamental values of each of the three great monotheistic religions, Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, are shared by all. And the admiration that Arabs in general have for American institution, and principles of governance, especially as articulated by the US Constitution, runs deep and wide."

Prince Al Walid also extended his generosity to ADC when he pledged to help ADC purchase a building that will house its National office and a cultural center.

SUNDAY, MAY 29

On Sunday morning, "Prospects for Peace in Palestine" featuring Salman Abu Sitta, was the only panel. George Majeed Khoury, Treasurer of the ADC Board of Directors, introduced Abu Sitta who discussed the Palestinian right of return and its implementation.

ADC held its members-only General Assembly meeting and workshops on creating organizations on campuses, chapter organizing, and broadcasting on cable access. The Sunday Luncheon featured the Rachel Corrie Award Recipient; Brian Avery who movingly spoke about his experience in Palestine after he was shot in the face by Israeli Defense Force soldiers. Rachel Corrie's father and sister Sarah Corrie Simpson were present in the audience. ADC Founder James Abourezk also presented an award to Alison Weir of "If Americans Knew." The Sunday Luncheon was also an opportunity to thank and honor those who have served ADC and the larger Arab-American community. ADC also thanked long-standing staff member Marvin Wingfield for his commitment to ADC over past two and a half decades.
ADC thanks all of you for helping to celebrate ADC's 25th Year Silver Anniversary.

For permission to reprint and or request for photos, contact Laila Al-Qatami or Siwar Bandar at 202-244-2990.

MIM:Could Siwar Bandar be related to Prince Bander ?

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http://www.adc.org/schedule.htm

Convention Schedule

FRIDAY, MAY 27

9:00 am
Registration, Open All day

10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Private ADC Board of Directors Meeting

10:15 am - 1:00 pm
Arab-American Veterans to lay a wreath at the Tomb of Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery
Transportation provided, R.S.V.P., including your SSN to Christine Gleichert at 202-244-2990 or via email to: christine@adc.org

1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Special Tour of Capitol Hill.

This private tour, led by Hon. Mary Rose Oakar, will take you to through the US Capitol and onto the Floor of the House of Representatives (where the President's State of the Union is delivered). US Members of Congress will address the Group.

For security reasons, you must sign up for the tour in advance. Please R.S.V.P., including your SSN to Christine Gleichert at 202-244-2990 or via email to: christine@adc.org

4:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Silver Anniversary Celebration and Reception at the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates

Remarks by Democratic National Committee Chair Howard Dean* and Ken Mehlman*.

Remarks by Republican National Committee Chair Ken Mehlman*.

7:30 pm - 10:00 pm
Evening of Entertainment Including Concerts

MC - Jack Shaheen, Professor and Author

Remarks by Casey Kasem and daughter Kerri Kasem

Jaime Farr*, Award Winning Actor

Kathy Najimy*, Award Winning Actress

Tony Shalhoub*, Emmy and Tony Winning Actor


Concert with Simon Shaheen and Qantara, Award Winning Musician and Composer

Musical Performance by internationally-acclaimed Kulna Sawa

Comic Performance by Maysoon Zayid

Piano Recital by Zade Dirani

Jack Shaheen Scholarship Awards Presentation

Radius of Arab American Writers (RAWI) Literary Awards

10 pm - 1 am
Hafleh


SATURDAY, MAY 28

8:00 am
Registration, Open All day

8:45 am - 9:30 am
ADC: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

HE Clovis Maksoud, The American University

Prof. Clovis Maksoud, Center for the Global South, The American University

9:00 am
Film Screenings, All Day

9:45 am - 11:00 am
Media Roundtable: Covering the War on Terror

Facilitator: Helen Thomas, Journalist

Hafez Al-Mirazi, Bureau Chief, Al Jazeera

George Hishmeh, President, Washington Arab Journalists Association

Hussein Ibish, Vice-Chair, Progressive Muslim Union

Mike Sallah, Pulitzer Prize Writer, Toledo Blade

9:45 am - 11:00 am
Assessment of success and failure and future challenges to the US enterprise in Iraq

Fecilitator: Phyllis Bennis, Institute for Policy Studies

Ayad Al-Qazzaz, Professor, California State University

Edmund Ghareeb, Professor, The American University

Colonel W. Patrick Lang, President, Global Resources Group, former Defense Intelligence Officer

Rick Olson, Director, Iraq Office Political Section, State Department

11:15 am - 12:30 pm
"Democratization" of the Middle East

Facilitator: David Khairallah, Esq., ADC Board of Director

David W. Mulenex, Senior Regional Coordinator, Middle East Partnership Initiative, Department of State

HE Clovis Maksoud, Director, Center for the Global South, The American University

11:15 am - 12:30 pm
In Defense of Academic Freedom

Facilitator: Christine Gleichert, ADC Legislative Director

Dr. Michael Hudson, Director, CCAS, Georgetown University

Joseph Massad*, Assistant Professor, Columbia University

Tarik Ramadan, Professor, University of Frouburg, Switzerland

11:15 am - 12:30 pm
Questions and Answers w/ Your Federal Government

Facilitator: Nawar Shora, ADC's Director of Law Enforcement Outreach Program

Sharee Freeman, Director of Community Relations Service, Department of Justice

William J. Sanchez, Office of Special Counsel, Department of Justice

Rebekah Tosado, DHS Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Representative from the FBI

Representative from Immigration and Customs Enforcement, DHS

Joseph Mansour, Employment Discrimination, Federal Corrections Officer, U.S.Bureau of Prisons

Walied Shater, U.S. Secret Service

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
ADC Annual Civil Rights Awards Luncheon

MC- Hon. Mary Rose Oakar, ADC President

Keynote Speaker: Daniel Sutherland, Director, Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties - US Department of Homeland Security

Special Guest: R. Alexander Acosta, Assistant Attorney General

Distinguished Service Award: Laura Murphy, ACLU Legislative Director, with special introduction and remarks by Gregory Nojeim, Deputy Director, ACLU Legislative Office

Introduction and Remarks by Gregory Nojeim, Deputy Director, ACLU Legislative Office, former ADC Legal Director

Excellence in Advocacy Award: Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF) and Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund (SALDEF)

ADC Pro Bono Attorney of the Year: Mathew B. Tully, Esq.

ADC Advocate Award: Nabih Ayad, JD

ADC Distinguished Federal Public Service Award: Hon. George Caram Steeh, US District Court - Eastern Michigan

ADC Communinity Leadership Award: Hon. Sam A. Salamey, President, Lebanese American Heritage Club

2:15 pm - 3:30 pm
Arab-American Women: Making a Difference

Facilitator: Laila Al-Qatami, ADC Communications Director

Rana Abbas Chami, ADC Michigan Deputy Director

Linda Mansour, Esq., ADC Board of Director

Helen Samhan, Executive Director, Arab American Institute Foundation

2:15 pm - 3:30 pm
Civil Rights Discussion: Liberty and Security

Facilitator: Kareem Shora, ADC Director of Legal Policy

Timothy Edgar, Esq., ACLU, Legislative Counsel for National Security Issues

Noel Saleh, Esq., President, Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS)

Ahmed Younis, MPAC National Director


3:45 pm - 5:00 pm
The Syria-Lebanon Crisis: Causes, Risks, and Solutions

Facilitator: David Khairallah, Esq., ADC Board of Director

Juan Cole, Professor, University of Michigan

Ambassador Theodore Kattouf, President, AMIDEAST

David Lesch, Professor, Trinity University

3:45 pm - 5:00 pm
Growing Up Arab-American

Facilitator: Siwar Bandar, ADC Communications Coordinator

Bobby Ina

Tarek Ismail*

Noor Najeeb

Rebecca Abouchedid, Policy Analyst, Arab American Institute

3:45 pm - 5:00 pm
Know Your Rights Workshop

Presented by the ADC Legal Advisors: Carol Khawly, Leila Laoudji, Kareem Shora, and Nawar Shora with the Summer Legal Associates Featuring Partering for Prevention Project, Northeastern University

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Reception

Starting 7:00 pm
ADC's 25th Anniversary Gala

MC - Safa Rifka, Chair, ADC Board of Directors

Greetings: Former President Jimmy Carter, Former President George Bush & Former President William Clinton*

Comic Performance by Aron Kader

Featured Keynote Address & ADC Global Achievement Award - HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdul Aziz Alsaud

ADC Lifetime Advocacy Award - Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan

Keynote Speakers include Hon. John Conyers (D-MI) and Former Senator George McGovern

ADC Lifetime Excellence in Public Service Award - The Honorable John Conyers, Jr., "

ADC Lifetime Excellence in Public Service Award - The Honorable Nick J. Rahall, II

ADC Family Business Award - George and Colleen Maloof Family, Maloof Companies

ADC American Business Achievement Award - Naseeb Saliba, Tutor-Saliba Company

ADC American Business Achievement Award - William Hanna, Cedars Bank

ADC American Business Achievement Award - Fawaz "Tony" Ismail, Alamo Flag Company

Alex Odeh Activist Award - James & Betty Sams

ADC Excellence in US Journalism Award - Mike Sallah, Pulitzer Prize Winner, Toledo Blade

ADC Excellence in International Media Award - Sheikh Waleed Bin Ibrahim Al Brahim, MBC Group

ADC Excellence in Journalism on Behalf of Arab Americans - Joseph R. Haiek

ADC Excellence in Arab Journalism Award - Al-Jazeera

ADC Distinguished Service Award - Haifa Fakhouri, CEO, Arab American and Chaldean Council

Piano Solo: Zade Dirani

Comic Performance by Aron Kader

Young Artists Display

Hafleh After Gala and Featured Musical Performance by internationally-acclaimed Kulna Sawa

SUNDAY, MAY 29

8:30 am
Registration

9:00 am - 10:30 am
General Assembly - ADC Members Only

10:45 am - 12:15 pm
Prospects for Peace in Palestine

Featured Speaker: Salman Abu Sitta, President, Palestine Land Society

12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
ADC's 25th Anniversary Luncheon: Our History, Our Future

Special Presentation, Voices and Video Led by: ADC Founder Hon. James Abourezk and Past President Albert Mokhiber

Silver Medallion Awards: Honoring those who have served ADC since 1980

Special Film Presentation on ADC from 1980 to 2005

Hala Maksoud Award: To be Announced at the Convention

Rachel Corrie Award: Brian Avery

2:45 pm - 5:00 pm
Organizing Workshops

How to Broadcast on Cable Access: Alternate Focus

How to Establish an ADC Chapter and Build Membership

How to Fundraise for ADC Chapters

How to Start a Student Organization on Campus.

(Each workshop will be conducted twice.)


-----------------------------

http://www.adc.org/Doc/HRH_Speech.doc

MIM :Saudi Prince Al Walid Bin Talal Al Saud pledges to fund Islamist enterprises in America via the Kingdom Holding Company and build the ADC a new building . In addition he pledges to work together with ADC,CAIR and AAI, to "provide needed support"

That should not signal, however, an end to our efforts to build bridges and to promote greater understanding between us and the West. A great deal needs to be done to acquaint westerners with our culture and Islamic norms. Too many stereotypes about us abound, and far too many distortions of our beliefs are spread. We have to engage key elements in American society to dispel what many in the media, wittingly or unwittingly, propagate. A more meaningful and pervasive dialogue between the three faiths has to be initiated and sustained. And a certain perspective has to be added to the discussions in the corridors of power, be they at the official or public levels. The strategy followed should be measured and proportionate, and we have to complement and reinforce each other to have maximum effect. We have to be clear in our focus, and confident that our goals can be met. In this process of acculturation we have to be aware that the gains are slow and incremental and that it takes time to reach the desired end. But the task before us cannot wait, for there is too much at stake. That is why I, through Kingdom Holding Company, have already begun the process of establishing think-tanks, foundations and centers, as well as partnering with institutions of higher learning in the United States. Needless to say, we are more than prepared to work with organizations such as ADC, CAIR, Arab-American Institute, to name only a few, and to provide needed support. What we have before us will not be easy, but I am convinced that with your help, and the help of others, God willing, we will eventually succeed. Rest assured that I for one will spare neither effort nor treasure in reaching our common goals. Thank you.

For further information, contact:

Kingdom Holding Company

+966-1-211-1111

The following is the full text of the Prince's speech….

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

In the Name of Allah, The Compassionate, The Merciful

Thank you (Mr./Ms) for your introduction and for your kind words.

Allow me at the outset to say how delighted I am to be with you today and to be part of the celebration of the 25th anniversary of ADC's annual convention. It is indeed an occasion to be proud of, particularly when one looks back at what ADC has accomplished in those years. It has galvanized the Arab-American community in fighting discrimination, in seeking to have Arab-Americans play a more meaningful and effective role in the American political process, and in correcting the unflattering image in which Arabs and Muslims in general are often portrayed. This it has done through systematic organization, conventions, and the establishment of chapters in many of the fifty states. It has utilized the avenues and channels that are readily available to one and all in the magnificent open forum that the American political system affords. In that way, the Arab-American community has finally taken its place among other ethnic interest groups in having a significant political impact and in safeguarding its core concerns. And it has allied itself with other interest groups in reaffirming and promoting the values on which this great country was built, and which, regrettably, a few sometimes are prone to forget. Prejudice is prejudice, whatever its source or intended victims. We are all diminished whenever or wherever it surfaces in our midst. And it runs contrary not only to our respective faiths, but to one of the basic tenets enshrined in the Declaration of Independence, namely, that all men are created equal. And it certainly goes against America's call to the rest of the world, as is inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, "Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore, Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door." It is an open invitation to the rest of humanity, without any hint of preference or discrimination, to come and partake of the American dream through unfettered access to the unlimited opportunities which this country uniquely provides.

Within this vibrant American context, the Arab-American community, has certainly distinguished itself. In almost every field of endeavor, be it in education, medicine, law, business, banking, retailing, construction, politics, entertainment, what have you, Arab-Americans have made their mark. Their achievements have certainly demolished the myth that Arabs, and Muslims, are, by virtue of their culture and religion, innately incapable of certain attainments and cannot mesh with the norms of western life. By almost every measure, Arab-Americans today stand well above the crowd. A few statistics from data collected by the US Census Bureau in the year 2000, and recently cited in an article in the Financial Times, (May 4, 2005) can illustrate my point. In education, 40 percent of Arab-Americans are college graduates, in contrast to 24 percent for Americans as a whole. The median annual income of an Arab-American family in the U.S. is 52,300 dollars, 4.6 percent higher than the figure for all other American families. 42 percent of people of Arab descent work as professionals and managers, while the same is true for only 34 percent of the general American population. Furthermore, more than half of Arab-Americans own their own homes.

Needless to say, we in the Arab World derive a good measure of pride and reflected glory from your attainments and gains. Furthermore, your accomplishments provide a corrective antidote to what is often said about us abroad. And they deepen the recognition that such success can indeed be realized in the Arab World if only we were to create a suitable setting to foster and unleash the abundant talent that we have at home. To succeed, however, we have to institute reforms in governance, law, banking, finance, education, to mention a few. Above all, we have to nurture the notion of civil society, with all the participatory citizen involvement that this term connotes.

There is no denying the fact that the Arab region has for long lagged behind other parts of the world. Except for sub-Saharan Africa, it is at the bottom of the heap. Nearly fifty percent of the Arab population is illiterate. Expenditure on research and development is so pitifully small that it barely counts. Many of the so-called institutions of higher learning are in reality no more than adult day-care centers to occupy the young. The combined GDP of all the Arab states is considerably less than that of the state of Texas . In fact, Florida alone has a GDP greater than that of all the so-called oil rich Arab states of the Gulf put together. The unemployment rates are so high, particularly among the youth, that, before long, they are certain to pose a threat to the stability of the political and social orders in many of the Arab states. And to make matters worse, the incredibly high birth rates that characterize their demographics will soon be overwhelming in their effect. Furthermore, Arab women are so marginalized that Arab societies cannot fully benefit from the talents that they have and that they would bring. Arab countries attract only a very miniscule portion of total foreign investment world-wide All of this, and much more, is fully documented in the recently published United Nations' reports on Human Development in the Arab World. As you can see, you and your forbears certainly did not miss much by having left the Arab World. I fear that I may have just dissipated any sense of nostalgia you may have had for the old country, or any desire to return.

There is of course nothing in Islam or Arab culture that disposes or predestines us to this sorry state. As you are all well aware, there was a time when Arab and Islamic civilization was a shining light. In virtually every field of knowledge it led the world. In philosophy, medicine, astronomy, sociology, mathematics, the names of those such as Al-Farabi, Ibn Rushd, Ibn Sina, Ibn Khaldun, Al-Khwarizmi, are to this day acknowledged and paid homage to throughout. And far from what is often propagated by certain circles in the West, it was the over-arching precept of Islamic tolerance that afforded the requisite conviviality among the different faiths and communities which led to the flourishing cultural life that characterized such cities as Damascus, Baghdad, Cordoba, Granada and Seville.

It is not my intention to dwell on the past, or to burden you with what you, as heirs to this civilization, already know. Nor is it my wish to preach to the converted, so to speak. My purpose is to affirm that we have the capability to escape from our current malaise. History teaches us that civilizations have their ups and downs, and that they can be revitalized provided their citizenries have the will to change and reform. Who would have thought after World War II that China, with the tremendous upheavals that it had for centuries endured, would within the span of a few decades, attain the heights that it has now reached?

For us in the Arab World to develop we shall need the help and support of the West, particularly of the United States. Your role in this enterprise is critical, for you are the natural linchpin, the bridge if you will, that can connect us to this great nation in a manner that transcends strategic interests or oil. Our relationship with the American people, indeed our image in America, cannot be allowed to fluctuate in tandem with the rise and fall in the price of a barrel of oil. Nor can we allow ourselves to be viewed merely as gas station attendants who sole raison d'etre is to supply gasoline for thirsty cars and SUV's. And as Arabs and Muslims, we can never let a few shrill and radical fanatics in our midst drown out the voices of tolerance and moderation, or to undermine the cordial relationships that have been developed over time.

There is no escaping the fact that 9/11 dealt a terrible blow to the amicable ties that had hitherto existed between the American people and those in the Arab and Islamic worlds. The image of Arabs and Muslims was suddenly and radically transformed on that fateful day. True enough, the caricature of the Arab in America was not always flattering, but it did not have the very threatening and sinister connotations that it acquired after those tragic events. The Arab, or Muslim, was no longer the object of puzzlement or curiosity, but an enemy who posed a mortal threat. This applied not only to those from abroad, but to American Muslims as well, as recent surveys have shown. According to a poll released by Cornell University this past December, 44 percent of all Americans believe that the U.S. government should restrict the civil liberties of Muslim Americans. 27 percent were in favor of requiring all Muslims to register with the Federal authorities in the areas in which they lived. Furthermore, 22 percent of the respondents favored racial profiling in an effort to identify potential terrorists, while 29 percent thought that undercover agents should keep tabs on Muslim civic organizations by infiltrating their ranks.

But whatever stresses and strains the Arab and Muslim communities in the United States have had to endure in the wake of 9/11, they really pale when compared to the vilification that was hurled at the Arab and Muslim worlds. What perhaps began as a well intentioned discussion in the American media aimed at understanding the roots of the fanaticism that would drive individuals to commit such depraved acts quickly degenerated into sustained attacks on virtually every aspect of Arab and Islamic institutions and thought. There was hardly anything that was deemed sacrosanct, or that was spared. Saudi Arabia, of course, became the principal object of scrutiny, and a prime target of this onslaught. Saudi Arabia was now under a microscope, and every facet of its society was dissected, examined and weighed. There was little that was judged worthy of even the faintest of praise.

There was, of course, no escaping the fact that fifteen of the nineteen perpetrators of the attacks on the United States were Saudi nationals. And it was perfectly understandable that with the raw emotions that were unleashed immediately by those events, Americans would fail to appreciate that the fifteen Saudis involved were not in any way representative of the Saudi population as a whole, and that the brand of Islam that they espoused was contrary to the explicit emphasis on tolerance and forbearance that Islam taught.. Happily enough, a moderation of attitudes can now be discerned, and American-Saudi relations, at least at the official level, are gradually reverting to their previously amicable course.

The events of 9/11 were for many of us in the Middle East a wake-up call. It jolted us into taking a closer look at the ideologies that were being disseminated among our youth, and at the deviant behavior that such thoughts induced. We re-examined our text-books, and listened closely to sermons, with a view to excising whatever prejudice and intolerance that was being propagated and preached. We recast our school curricula to bring them in tune with what we truly believed.

Quite a few among us strongly felt that salutary though these steps were, a great deal more needed to be done to bridge the gulf that separated the Arab and Muslim worlds from Western countries, particularly the United States. We had to help enlighten Americans and Europeans about our history, culture, religion and values, and at the same time to inform in a systematic way our own people, especially the young, about the West. I, personally, was appalled to learn that there was not a single center of American studies and research in the entire Arab World, this despite the fact that the United States has had more of an impact on our region than any other major power over the past sixty years. So I took it upon myself to establish two such centers, one at the American University in Cairo and another at the American University of Beirut. And to help stimulate interest among young Western scholars in our region, I endowed a scholarship fund at the University of Exeter in the UK to make it possible for European and American students to travel to the Arab countries in order to study and to conduct research. And clearly, the task would not be in any way fulfilled unless we were to broaden and deepen American understanding of the complexities of our societies and to foster greater appreciation of the religious and cultural dynamics that have shaped our history, and that continue to color our view of the world. As such, my office is currently discussing with various institutions in the U.S. the possibility of establishing centers of Arab and Islamic Studies in their midst.

The more I reflect on the state of relations between the United States and the Arab and Muslim worlds, the more I am convinced that what unites us is infinitely greater than the elements that divide. Many of the fundamental values of each of our three great monotheistic religions, Christianity, Islam and Judaism, are shared by all. And the admiration that Arabs in general have for American institutions and principles of governance, especially as articulated in the U.S. Constitution, runs deep and wide. We applaud American creativity, entrepreneurship, its unbridled optimism and sense of fair play. America's hospitality to new ideas, and its receptivity to change, are unmatched anywhere in the world. Above all, the guarantees of freedom of speech, due process, and equality before the law, as enshrined in its basic laws, set a standard that we in the Arab World aspire to and someday hope to attain. And as you well know, the hundreds of thousands of Arabs who have studied in the U. S continue to harbor the most intense feelings of affection and gratitude for the American people, as well as a deep nostalgia for the years that they have spent there. In that respect, the Arabs, in general, can easily be characterized as pro-American, as I am.

We cannot, of course, gloss over the fact that there have been over the years, and there still are, major differences between the U.S. and Arab governments in regard to a number of issues, chief among which is the seemingly intractable Israeli-Palestinian dispute. For us Arabs, this is a highly volatile and emotive question that insinuates itself into the way American policy toward the Middle East is assayed and judged. What has happened in Palestine in the past sixty or more years represents for us a grave injustice to which, in the eyes of many, the U.S. has lent a helping hand. It is a source of puzzlement, not to mention of disappointment, that this great country, with its lofty principles of justice and fairness, could be complicit, directly or indirectly, in the pain and suffering that our Palestinian kin continue to endure. Such complicity would have been expected of certain European powers, whose history of betrayal and perfidy in the region was well known, but not of the United States, the country of Jefferson, Lincoln and Wilson. The United States is deemed to have different and higher standards, and therefore the disillusionment has been all the more great. But let us hope that a resolution to the Palestinian issue will soon be found, and that a Palestinian state will emerge before long.

That should not signal, however, an end to our efforts to build bridges and to promote greater understanding between us and the West. A great deal needs to be done to acquaint westerners with our culture and Islamic norms. Too many stereotypes about us abound, and far too many distortions of our beliefs are spread. We have to engage key elements in American society to dispel what many in the media, wittingly or unwittingly, propagate. A more meaningful and pervasive dialogue between the three faiths has to be initiated and sustained. And a certain perspective has to be added to the discussions in the corridors of power, be they at the official or public levels. The strategy followed should be measured and proportionate, and we have to complement and reinforce each other to have maximum effect. We have to be clear in our focus, and confident that our goals can be met. In this process of acculturation we have to be aware that the gains are slow and incremental and that it takes time to reach the desired end. But the task before us cannot wait, for there is too much at stake. That is why I, through Kingdom Holding Company, have already begun the process of establishing think-tanks, foundations and centers, as well as partnering with institutions of higher learning in the United States. Needless to say, we are more than prepared to work with organizations such as ADC, CAIR, Arab-American Institute, to name only a few, and to provide needed support. What we have before us will not be easy, but I am convinced that with your help, and the help of others, God willing, we will eventually succeed. Rest assured that I for one will spare neither effort nor treasure in reaching our common goals. Thank you.

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MIM: The event posting on the ADC website lists a "Friend in Government" award being given to Alexander Acosta the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights. How long until the ADC renames it the Dhimmitude Reward for lackey in government ?

March 21, 2005-The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC) is happy to announce that it will be holding its 25th Year Silver Anniversary Convention from May 27-29, 2005, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel located on Capitol Hill in Washington DC.

For ADC and the community, this year's Convention will be particularly timely and relevant because it will mark ADC's Silver Anniversary. Founded in 1980, ADC is celebrating 25 years of dedicated service to civil and human rights. We hope that you will be able to join us in taking pride in the tremendous efforts and successes of ADC over the years. We also hope that you will join us as we seek to enhance this record of consistent achievement on behalf of civil rights at home, and peace and justice in the Middle East. You can learn more about the 25th Year Silver Anniversary Convention and register online at: http://www.adc.org/registration.html

The Convention will, as always, serve to be the largest annual gathering of Arab Americans and supporters to meet, organize, and plan activities. Participants will be able to attend informative panel discussions and workshops on civil rights, understanding immigration issues, Palestine and Iraq, domestic and foreign policy affairs, organizing and empowerment, and media relations, among others. ADC will be providing more details on these panels and workshops as the information becomes available.

As with previous Conventions, civil rights and liberties will be a major focus for speakers, panels and award recipients. As part of the Convention, ADC will be holding its Annual Civil Rights Awards Luncheon, scheduled from 12:30-2:00 on Saturday May 28. This event has traditionally served as the primary forum where convention attendees learn about the issues affecting their rights and the steps their government, and civil rights organization, are taking to address civil rights and liberties, and immigrants' rights in a constructive and effective approach.

At this time, guests include:
* Daniel Sutherland, Director, Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties at the US Department of Homeland Security. Mr. Sutherland will be the keynote speaker at the Annual Civil Rights Awards Luncheon on Saturday [confirmed].

* Laura Murphy, Director, American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Legislative Office. Winner of the ADC "2005 Distinguished Service Award." (Special introduction and remarks by Gegory Nojeim, Deputy Director, ACLU Legislative
Office) [confirmed].

* "ADC Excellence in Advocacy Award" winners this year include: the Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund (SALDEF) [invited] and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF) [invited].

* Alexander Acosta, Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights. Winner of the 2005 ADC "Friend in Government Award" [invited].

Additionally, one of the highlights on Saturday May 28, is a panel entitled, "Civil Rights Discussion: Liberty AND Security," facilitated by Kareem Shora, Director of Legal Policy at ADC. Panelists include:

1) Timothy Edgar, Legislative Counsel for National Security Issues, ACLU [invited]
2) Cory Smith, Legislative Counsel, Human Rights First [invited]
3) Ahmed Younis, National Director, Muslim Public Affairs Council (MPAC) [confirmed]



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