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Militant Islam Monitor > Articles > Being Muslim means never saying you're sorry - US apology for non event will be seen as weakness & spark more violence

Being Muslim means never saying you're sorry - US apology for non event will be seen as weakness & spark more violence

Even if the Koran flushing happened - so what ? Why is the US accomodating the Islamo facist weltaanshaaung ?
May 16, 2005

"...We can understand torturing prisoners, no matter how repulsive," ... "But insulting the Qur'an is like deliberately torturing all Muslims. This we cannot tolerate."..." http://msnbc.msn.com/id/7857407/site/newsweek/

MIM: For the US military to apologize to a bunch of rampaging bloodthirsty Islamists who have shown they prefer to die for an imagined slight to a book- rather then accept it never happened, will be seen as a sign of dhimmitude in the Muslim world and lead to more violence.Any show of deference is regarded as fear and a tacit admission of the other's superiority and viewed as weakness in the Muslim world, where the concept of forgiveness and apology does not exist . Despite the fact that the Koran flushing never happened, and is part of a strategy which is outlined in Al Qaeda training manuals as making false allegations against infidels, the US is still talking of apologies. And even if one Koran was flushed down a toilet - why won't the US government tell Muslims to 'get over it' and demand that Muslims start by 'apologizing' for 9/11 and demand compensation for the families of victims of beheadings and suicide bombings which they have committed against Americans and are continuing on a daily basis throughout the world ? It is also clear that Muslims find feeling and fantasy more precious then life,itself . When has anyone the Muslim expressed condemnation or outrage over the attacks on Iraqi civilians bytheir co religionists ?

For the US military to go on the defensive, and actually apologize for something which never occured is to set a dangerous precedent, namely, that we in the West are willing to throw away our integrity and belief system, and live in a world where perception is reality. Once we have accepted the enemies terms, they will believe we are only a step way from the ultimate submission, namely conversion to Islam.

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N16483593.htm

Newsweek retracts story on Koran desecration 16 May 2005 21:39:50 GMT
Source: Reuters
H NEW YORK, May 16 (Reuters) - Newsweek on Monday retracted a report that claimed U.S. interrogators at Guantanamo Bay had desecrated the Koran, which triggered days of rioting in Afghanistan and other countries in which at least 16 people were killed.

"Based on what we know now, we are retracting our original story that an internal military investigation had uncovered Koran abuse at Guantanamo Bay," Newsweek Editor Mark Whitaker said in a statement.

The White House on Monday challenged the accuracy of Newsweek's May 9 report which was based on an anonymous source and said it had damaged the U.S. image overseas.

The Pentagon said an investigation remained open into allegations contained in the Newsweek report.

Whitaker apologized on Sunday to the victims of the protests and said the magazine had inaccurately reported that U.S. military investigators had confirmed personnel at the detention facility in Cuba had flushed the Muslim holy book down the toilet.

"The report has had serious consequences," White House spokesman Scott McClellan said. "People have lost their lives. The image of the United States abroad has been damaged."

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Newsweek apologizes; checking Koran story

Newsweek / Koran Pakistani protesters burn a U.S. flag to condemn alleged desecration of Islam's holy book Quran at the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during a protest in Peshawar, Pakistan on Sunday, May 15, 2005. (AP Photo/M. Sajjad)

Pakistani protesters burn a U.S. flag to condemn alleged desecration of Islam's holy book Quran at the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during a protest in Peshawar, Pakistan on Sunday, May 15, 2005. (AP Photo/M. Sajjad)

Afghan students destroy an American flag as one shouts 'Death to America' during a protest in Kabul on Thursday May 12, 2005. (AP / David Guttefnelder)

Afghan students destroy an American flag as one shouts 'Death to America' during a protest in Kabul on Thursday May 12, 2005. (AP / David Guttefnelder)

Update:

Newsweek magazine has apologized for a report that claimed the Islamic holy book was desecrated at the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay.

It was just a small story, but it has sparked massive protests across the Islamic world that have seen at least 15 people killed in protests in Afghanistan.

The story alleged that interrogators at the U.S. base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, placed Korans in washrooms to unsettle suspects, and in one case "flushed a holy book down the toilet."

On Monday, the editors of Newsweek promised to re-examine the allegations.

"We regret that we got any part of our story wrong, and extend our sympathies to victims of the violence and to the U.S. soldiers caught in its midst," Newsweek editor Mark Whitaker wrote in the magazine's May 23 issue, out Sunday.

Whitaker said the magazine's information came from a knowledgeable U.S. government source. But he said the source later said he wasn't sure whether the Koran incident actually happened.

Reaction to the May 9 story has been strong in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and other Muslim countries. Desecrating the Koran and Muhammad, Islam's prophet, is a death-penalty offence in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Pakistan's President Gen. Pervez Musharraf and Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz, both allies of Washington, have both demanded a probe of the reported desecration of the Koran.

Stephen Hadley, the U.S. national security adviser, has promised to investigate the allegation.

"If it turns out to be true, obviously we will take action against those responsible, Stephen Hadley said in an interview for CNN's "Late Edition."

Meanwhile, the religious leader in Pakistan, Ahmed, said Islamic groups in Pakistan, Egypt, Malaysia, Britain and Turkey plan to hold protests on May 27.

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http://www.timesofoman.com/newsdetails.asp?newsid=15417

Quran issue: Pak demands US probe

ISLAMABAD –– Pakistan renewed its demand on Monday that the United States conduct a thorough probe and share its findings into reported desecration of the Quran, despite a clarification issued by Newsweek that its story may be wrong.

"We have noted the clarification issued by the Newsweek that the story may be based on certain wrong assumptions," foreign office spokesman Jalil Abbas Jilani told a weekly press briefing.

"Nevertheless we have condemned the reported incident in the strongest possible terms. We have asked a thorough investigation be conducted by the US administration and we would expect the results of the official investigation shared with us."

Newsweek magazine reported last week that US interrogators at Guantanamo Bay detention camp in Cuba had defiled copies of the Muslim holy book and stuffed one down a lavatory to rattle Muslim prisoners.

Pakistan was the first country to condemn the reported desecration of the Koran which triggered violence in neighbouring Afghanistan where 14 people died in clashes between protesters and Afghan police.

Pakistani religious parties staged rallies across the country on Friday in which angry Muslims torched the US flag and criticised the policies of US President George W. Bush and his ally, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf.

Newsweek said on Sunday its story might be wrong, explaining that when asked again, the senior US official who had remembered seeing details of the Quran incident in a report could no longer be sure of the event.

White House spokesman Scott McClellan on Friday said the US administration takes the allegation "very seriously" and reaffirmed that the Defense Department had launched an investigation. Pakistan has sent thousands of troops into its northwestern tribal districts bordering Afghanistan to hunt Al-Qaeda militants who may have sneaked across the frontier after the ousting of the Taliban in late 2001. –– AFP

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White House bashes Newsweek report on Koran 16 May 2005

Source: Reuters

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N16446947.htm

WASHINGTON, May 16 (Reuters) - The White House said on Monday that a Newsweek report based on an anonymous source had damaged the U.S. image overseas by alleging that U.S. interrogators desecrated the Koran at Guantanamo Bay.

The May 9 report triggered several days of rioting in Afghanistan and other countries in which at least 16 people were killed.

Newsweek's editor, Mark Whitaker, apologized to the victims on Sunday and said the magazine inaccurately reported that U.S. military investigators had confirmed that personnel at the detention facility in Cuba had flushed the Muslim holy book down the toilet.

"It's puzzling that while Newsweek now acknowledges that they got the facts wrong, they refused to retract the story," White House spokesman Scott McClellan said. "I think there's a certain journalistic standard that should be met and in this instance it was not."

The report sparked violent protests across the Muslim world -- from Afghanistan, where 16 were killed and more than 100 injured, to Pakistan, Indonesia and Gaza. In the past week the reported desecration was condemned in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Bangladesh, Malaysia and by the Arab League.

McClellan complained that the story was "based on a single anonymous source who could not personally substantiate the allegation that was made."

"The report has had serious consequences," he said. "People have lost their lives. The image of the United States abroad has been damaged."

Newsweek said in its May 23 edition that the information had come from a "knowledgeable government source" who told Newsweek that a military report on abuse at Guantanamo Bay said interrogators flushed at least one copy of the Koran down a toilet in a bid to make detainees talk.

But the source later told the magazine he could not be certain he had seen an account of the Koran incident in the military report and that it might have been in other investigative documents or drafts, Newsweek said.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/usa/story/0,12271,1485122,00.html#article_continue

Pentagon attacks Newsweek over Qur'an story

Julia Day and agencies
Monday May 16, 2005

The Pentagon has attacked as "irresponsible" an article in Newsweek magazine alleging that US military interrogators desecrated copies of the Qur'an and accused the magazine of "hiding behind" anonymous sources.

Bryan Whitman, a spokesman for the Pentagon, claimed the report, in last week's issue, was "demonstrably false" adding that it had had "significant consequences that reverberated throughout Muslim communities around the world".

"Newsweek hid behind anonymous sources, which by their own admission do not withstand scrutiny.

"Unfortunately, they cannot retract the damage they have done to this nation or those that were viciously attacked by those false allegations."

The magazine has apologised for the story, in which it alleged interrogators at Guantánamo Bay had flushed a copy of the Qur'an down a toilet.

"We regret that we got any part of our story wrong, and extend our sympathies to victims of the violence and to the US soldiers caught in its midst," the apology read.

The story sparked protests across the Islamic world. In Afghanistan at least 17 people died and more than 100 were injured in the worst street violence the country has seen since US troops ousted the Taliban in 2001.

The chief spokesman at the Pentagon, Lawrence Di Rita, called the apology "very tepid and qualified," adding: "They owe us all a lot more accountability than they took."

"My reaction and I think our reaction is that Newsweek reported something that was factually inaccurate on several points. It's demonstrably wrong, and Newsweek has acknowledged that. But they have not retracted it, and have tried instead to water it down.

"They printed a story based on an erroneous source or sources that was demonstrably false and that resulted in riots in which people were killed. I don't know how else to parse it."

But in an interview, the Newsweek editor, Mark Whitaker, mounted a robust defence of his staff, insisting the magazine would not make any retraction, that it did nothing "professionally wrong", and that nobody at the title would be disciplined over the report.

Mr Whitaker said the magazine had gone to unusual lengths to ensure the accuracy of the original article, including showing a pre-publication draft to a US official, who chose to neither confirm nor deny the essence of the story.

"We're not retracting anything. We don't know what the ultimate facts are. Everybody did what they were supposed to do. We were dealing with a credible source... we approached officials for comment... we fully disclosed the whole chain of events so the public could reach its own conclusions.

"I don't see what we did professionally wrong in this case."

The source of the story had been reliable in the past, the editor said, and was in a position to know about the report he was describing.

"There are certain sources who will only talk to us on a not-for-attribution basis, particularly when it involves sensitive information, and who would be worried about retribution or other consequences if their identities were known."

On Sunday, President Bush's national security adviser, Stephen J Hadley, said on CNN that the administration was looking into the report "vigorously" and that if it proved to be true, disciplinary action would be taken against those responsible.

He also claimed that radical Islamic elements were using the report as an excuse to incite protests against the US government.

The magazine's apology comes as the use of anonymous sources by news organisations around the country is under heightened scrutiny. A series of retractions from papers, inclusing USA Today and the New York Times, has revealed fabrications by individual journalists and editorial shortcomings that failed to pick them up.

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16.05.2005: After week of riots, Newsweek admits it got Qur'an story wrong


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