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UK Police Arrest Three More Men In Connection With Terrorist Butchering Of Soldier Lee Rigby

May 25, 2013

LONDON – British police on Saturday arrested three more suspects in connection with the savage killing of an off-duty soldier that has raised fresh concerns about terrorism.

Scotland Yard said counter-terrorism officers arrested two men, aged 24 and 28, at a residential address in southeast London. A third man, 21, was arrested separately on a London street at the same time.

Police said they used a stun gun on two of the suspects. All three were detained on suspicion of conspiracy to commit murder.

Officers have already detained several others in connection with the murder of 25-year-old soldier Lee Rigby, who was hit with a vehicle then repeatedly stabbed with knives while walking outside the Royal Artillery Barracks in the Woolwich, south London, on Wednesday afternoon...

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"....Counterterrorism police on Saturday were questioning Abu Nusaybah, a friend of Michael Adebolajo, one of two suspects in the killing of Rigby. Nusaybah was arrested immediately after he gave a television interview telling his story about how Adebolajo came to be radicalized.

In the interview, Nusaybah said Adebolajo became withdrawn after returning from a visit to study in Kenya, where he claimed he had been physically and sexually abused in detention. Nusaybah also alleged that the U.K.'s security services tried to recruit Adebolajo after he returned to Britain.

Adebolajo and another man are suspected of killing Rigby, hacking at his body with knives and a meat cleaver, on a London street in front of dozens of passersby on Wednesday afternoon. Both suspects were shot by police at the scene and are hospitalized under guard in stable condition.

The BBC said Nusaybah was arrested by police outside its studios Friday night immediately after recording the interview.

"This interviewee had important background information that sheds light on this horrific event," the broadcaster said in a statement. "And when we asked him to appear and interviewed him, we were not aware he was wanted for questioning by the police."...

Woolwich attack: British soldier's death was more than 'lone wolf' attack

On Saturday night a further three men, aged 21, 24 and 28, were arrested in south-east London on suspicion of conspiracy to commit murder.

Police used Tasers to detain two of them and are searching four addresses.

Asked about growing indications that the attacks involved more than a "lone wolf", the Home Secretary said: "I think the indications, all the indications, would be for that.

"I can't go into details of the case, for obvious reasons its an ongoing investigation.

"There were some further arrests last night, some further searches have taken place. The police and the security service are working very hard in relation to this case.

We now have around 500 officers and others who are working on the case including some officers who have been bought through from counter terrorism units elsewhere in the country."

She suggested there may be a lower limit for imposing banning orders on extremists.

She said: "We do need to look, for example, at the question of whether perhaps we need to have banning orders to ban organisations that don't meet the threshold for proscription."

Mrs May defended the "excellent" work of the security and intelligence agencies in the face of claims mistakes were made in the handling of the two suspects, identified as Michael Adebolajo, 28, and Michael Oluwatobi Adebowale, 22, who were known MI5.

A childhood friend of Adebolajo has also claimed that the suspect was approached by MI5 six months ago and asked if he would work for the security service.

Yesterday, it emerged that one of the alleged killers of Drummer Lee Rigby appeared in court in Kenya suspected of leading a group of Islamists trying to join terrorists in Somalia.

The Sunday Telegraph has disclosed that Michael Adebolajo was held by police close to the Somali border with a band of "radicalised" Muslim youths who wanted to join the notorious al-Shabaab group.

He was deported to Britain after he appeared in court in Mombasa in November 2010.

Two months previously the head of MI5 had warned that Britons were training in Somalia and it was "only a matter of time before we see terrorism on our streets inspired by those who are today fighting alongside al-Shabaab". It also emerged that the other suspect in the soldier's murder, Michael Adebowale, 22, was detained by police in London two months ago after shopkeepers complained about a group of Muslim activists.

The disclosures raise further questions about the monitoring by the security services of Adebowale and Adebolajo, 28, whom sources have said was known to MI5 but not assessed as a "threat to life".

In other developments:

̃On Saturday night a further three men, aged 21, 24 and 28, were arrested in south-east London on suspicion of conspiracy to commit murder. Police used Tasers to detain two of them and were searching four addresses.

̃Calls were made for Anjem Choudary, the leader of the al-Muhajiroun group to which Adebolajo has been closely linked, to be subject to a Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measure, the successor to control orders;

̃Eric Pickles, the Communities Secretary, uses an article in The Sunday Telegraph to warn public bodies, including the police and judges, that it is time for them to bring the full weight of the law to bear on extremists and not be hampered by political correctness;

A leading historian who was a member of a Whitehall panel intended to tackle extremist Muslim preaching at universities told how officials opened a "dialogue" with a body that seemed to endorse aspects of extremism...

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