This item is available on the Militant Islam Monitor website, at http://www.militantislammonitor.org/article/id/3208

New Dutch Intelligence Report: Radical Islamic following increasing in Holland and becoming more "professional"

October 9, 2007

Number of radical Dutch Muslims growing, says intelligence report

http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/121246.html

Amsterdam - The Dutch intelligence and security service AIVD published a report on Tuesday indicating the number of radical Dutch Muslims is on the rise. The reports speaks about an "extremely intolerant and anti-democratic" movement which would however not be violent. The report, presented to Minister of Internal Affairs Guusje ter Horst, says Muslim neo-radicalism is characterized by an increasingly professional leadership. The non-violent neo-radicals are substantially less fragmented than radical Muslim groups that use violence, the AIVD says. According to the intelligence services' information, there are 15 to 20 Salafist preachers in the Netherlands, who are active in 30 to 35 mosques and youth centres. Another 20 salafist preachers are currently in training. Salafism is a radical and ultra-orthodox movement in Islam. The AIVD reports the radical message of Salafi Muslims appeals to some 20,000 to 30,000 of the Netherlands' 1 million Muslims. Moderate Muslims, Muslim gays and those who have renounced Islam are the primary target of neo-radical Islam, the AIVD writes. The Dutch intelligence service says neo-radicals may consciously obstruct the freedom and civil rights of the moderates. The chance that violence will eventually be used, is not to be excluded.
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AIVD-rapport: ĎRadicale dawa in verandering, de opkomst van islamitisch neoradicalisme in Nederland'

Downloads

https://www.aivd.nl/actueel-publicaties/aivd-publicaties/aivd-rapport

MIM: For an excerpt of the report in english see:

http://islamineurope.blogspot.com/2007/10/netherlands-aivd-report-on-radical.html

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MIM: Radio Netherlands on the AIVD report:

http://www.radionetherlands.nl/currentaffairs/isl071010

Salafism growing, but preaches no violence

by Security and Defence Editor Hans de Vreij*

10-10-2007

Muslim womanThe radicalisation process of Muslims in the Netherlands has entered a new phase, according to the Dutch General Intelligence and Security Service (AIVD). The Service has signalled the rise of a professionally-organised campaign to promote Salafism, a stream of fundamentalism within the Sunni branch of Islam with strong roots in Saudi Arabia. The AIVD says it does not preach violence, but the Service is nevertheless concerned about the possible effects of Salafist "mission activities" in the Netherlands.

The report from the AIVD is the third since 2004 that tries to provide an insight into radicalisation processes within a small minority of the million or so strong Muslim community in the Netherlands. The report doesn't describe the actual level of threat, but analyses the developments, background and the influences from abroad.

The first two phases
The first report, entitled 'From Dawa to jihad' (December 2004) described what the AIVD subsequently named the first phase in the radicalisation process - a study of how the radical Salafist preachers, mostly from abroad, were trying to gain influence in the Netherlands. The second report, 'The violent jihad in the Netherlands' (March 2006) dealt with what is now called the second phase - the period of the Hofstadgroep (a group of 14 Islamic youths suspected of terrorist activities), the murder of filmmaker Theo van Gogh, and the 'self-igniters' - young men who, without any external influencesapart from the Internet - develop ideas of violence. The AIVD now describes this period as "amateurish", but nevertheless no less dangerous.

Phase three
So now a third phase has begun: the Service signals, in a report of some 94 pages, the emergence of professionally-organized Dawa (preaching), which it defines as the missionary spreading of a radical-Islamic ideology from a Salafist angle, which explicitly does not champion violence. The rise of the Dawa is illustrated by, amongst other things, the fact that the number of Salafist readings has doubled in the past two years. Apart from that, the AIVD warns that the three described phases are not sharply defined - preachers from abroad and 'self-igniters' can still appear.

The AIVD has also adopted a new term for the most recent developments: "Islamic neoradicalism". According to the Service, there are now Dawa preachers active who are not, or only slightly, dependent on support from abroad; they operate using a "smart marketing strategy" which consciously avoids straying too close to the margins of Dutch law. The Internet is no longer a primary communications channel: it's now mosques and meeting halls, where priests are not interrupted by all the 'noise' of critical voices such as those in Internet forums and chat rooms.

The goal of the neoradicals
The goal of the 'neoradicals', according to the AIVD, is "setting up their own, Islamised enclaves in society where there's no place for dissidents or those with different beliefs." And although no violence is preached, the AIVD sees a serious threat to the Dutch constitution and democracy, such as strong pressure from the Salafist radicals on fellow-believers; the rejection of the Dutch legal order; tensions within the Muslim community or tensions between Muslims and non-Muslims. Above all, says the AIVD, it's still too early to be sure that the 'neoradical' movement will not combine the Dawa with violent jihad.

According to the Service, the professionalism of the new movement is also due to the fact that, since the end of last year, the Berber community in the Netherlands (the majority of the Moroccans living here) have begun readings in Tamazight, their own language. Interestingly enough, the AIVD says that within the similar-sized Turkish community in the Netherlands, there's little or no response to the Salafist message - possibly because it's seen as too Arabic and too conservative.

Also in other West European countries, Salafist groups are on the rise, says the AIVD in its third report. In Great Britain the authorities are actively seeking closer contact with the Salafists; that's seen as the only way to identify violent trends in time. It's not known if a similar pro-active approach will also be adopted in the Netherlands.influences apart from the Internet - develop ideas of violence. The AIVD now describes this period as "amateurish", but nevertheless no less dangerous.

Phase three
So now a third phase has begun: the Service signals, in a report of some 94 pages, the emergence of professionally-organized Dawa (preaching), which it defines as the missionary spreading of a radical-Islamic ideology from a Salafist angle, which explicitly does not champion violence. The rise of the Dawa is illustrated by, amongst other things, the fact that the number of Salafist readings has doubled in the past two years. Apart from that, the AIVD warns that the three described phases are not sharply defined - preachers from abroad and 'self-igniters' can still appear.

The AIVD has also adopted a new term for the most recent developments: "Islamic neoradicalism". According to the Service, there are now Dawa preachers active who are not, or only slightly, dependent on support from abroad; they operate using a "smart marketing strategy" which consciously avoids straying too close to the margins of Dutch law. The Internet is no longer a primary communications channel: it's now mosques and meeting halls, where priests are not interrupted by all the 'noise' of critical voices such as those in Internet forums and chat rooms.

The goal of the neoradicals
The goal of the 'neoradicals', according to the AIVD, is "setting up their own, Islamised enclaves in society where there's no place for dissidents or those with different beliefs." And although no violence is preached, the AIVD sees a serious threat to the Dutch constitution and democracy, such as strong pressure from the Salafist radicals on fellow-believers; the rejection of the Dutch legal order; tensions within the Muslim community or tensions between Muslims and non-Muslims. Above all, says the AIVD, it's still too early to be sure that the 'neoradical' movement will not combine the Dawa with violent jihad.

According to the Service, the professionalism of the new movement is also due to the fact that, since the end of last year, the Berber community in the Netherlands (the majority of the Moroccans living here) have begun readings in Tamazight, their own language. Interestingly enough, the AIVD says that within the similar-sized Turkish community in the Netherlands, there's little or no response to the Salafist message - possibly because it's seen as too Arabic and too conservative.

Also in other West European countries, Salafist groups are on the rise, says the AIVD in its third report. In Great Britain the authorities are actively seeking closer contact with the Salafists; that's seen as the only way to identify violent trends in time. It's not known if a similar pro-active approach will also be adopted in the Netherlands.

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http://www.trouw.nl/laatstenieuws/laatstenieuws/article816276.ece/Aanhang_radicale_islam_neemt_toe

Aanhang radicale islam neemt toe

(Novum) - De aanhang van de radicale islam neemt toe. Dat concludeert de Algemene Inlichtingen- en Veiligheidsdienst (AIVD) dinsdag in een rapport over moslimradicalisme in Nederland. Volgens de AIVD is de radicale islam een nieuwe fase ingegaan. Die zou zich kenmerken door een grotere professionele en strategische aansturing

Het karakter van dit zogenoemde islamitisch neoradicalisme is niet gewelddadig, stelt de AIVD. Wel is deze stroming 'zeer onverdraagzaam en antidemocratisch'. Zo streven aanhangers van de 'radicale dawa', die zich in Nederland vooral manifesteert in het politieke salafisme, volgens de AIVD naar een verregaande vorm van isolement en intolerantie tegenover andersdenkenden.

De groep die wordt bereikt door de radicale dawa groeit, stellen de onderzoekers vast. Deze moslims keren zich af van de samenleving. Dit is een sluipend proces, dat 'op den duur de cohesie en onderlinge solidariteit in de samenleving en de vrije uitoefening van (klassieke) grondrechten kan aantasten', waarschuwt de AIVD.

De veiligheidsdienst laakt de beeldvorming over de radicale islam waarin sprake is van 'een krachtige beweging die over niet al te lange tijd het Nederlandse politieke bestel van binnenuit omver zal werpen'. Zo erg is het niet, stelt de dienst. Toch mag de problematiek niet worden onderschat. De AIVD pleit voor een 'gerichte benadering op maat'.

Vorige maand zei minister van Binnenlandse Zaken Guusje ter Horst (PvdA) dat twintig- tot dertigduizend mensen in Nederland ontvankelijk zijn voor het salafisme. Onder hen zou zich een harde kern van 2500 activisten bevinden. Verder zijn in Nederland zo'n twintig salafistische jongerenpredikers actief.

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AIVD: De organisatie van moslimradicalisme professionaliseert

van onze verslaggever

Het moslimradicalisme is een nieuwe fase ingegaan, zegt de Algemene Inlichtingen- en Veiligheidsdienst AIVD. De dienst constateert dat de radicale dawa (bekeren en werven) in Nederland en West-Europa steeds verder professionaliseert.

De AIVD waarschuwt voor Ąde opkomst van islamitisch neoradicalisme in Nederland", in een rapport dat de minister van Binnenlandse Zaken en Koninkrijksrelaties vandaag naar de Tweede Kamer heeft gezonden.

In Nederland manifesteert deze stroming zich vooral in het politieke salafisme, een ultra orthodoxe stroming. Ondanks het niet-gewelddadige karakter van de radicale dawa, is deze stroming zeer onverdraagzaam en antidemocratisch, staat in de AIVD-rapportage. Zo streven aanhangers van de radicale dawa naar een verregaande vorm van isolement, gecombineerd met intolerantie ten aanzien van andersdenkenden.

De AIVD benadrukt dat de groep die bereikt wordt door de radicale dawa, groeit. De AIVD stelt dat de problematiek van het huidige moslimradicalisme niet mag worden overschat, net zo min als onderschat.

Minister Guusje ter Horst vertelde eerder dat het aantal moslims dat in Nederland mogelijk te beÔnvloeden is door de ideeŽn van het salafisme, tussen de 20.000 en 30.000 ligt. Er zijn ongeveer 2500 'potentiŽle activisten'.

http://www.trouw.nl/hetnieuws/nederland/article816256.ece/AIVD_De_organisatie_van_moslimradicalisme_professionaliseert

Datum nieuwsfeit: 09-10-2007 Dit is een authentiek persberichtBron: VVD
VVD

http://www.nieuwsbank.nl/inp/2007/10/09/L013.htm

9-10-2007

VVD verbaasd over laconieke reactie op rapport AIVD

De VVD vindt de reactie van het kabinet op het rapport van de AIVD bizar.

Laetitia Griffith: "Het betreft hier een groep die weliswaar geen geweld gebruikt, maar zich afsluit van de Nederlandse normen en waarden. Een groep die het vrije democratische debat op deze wijze beperkt, moet worden aangepakt. Het kabinet reageert wederom te slap. Praten en theedrinken is het voorstel. Deze mensen willen niet praten, ze willen niets met de Nederlandse maatschappij te maken hebben."


VVD "surprised" over "laconic" reaction to AIVD report

The VVD finds the reaction of the House to the AIVD report bizarre.

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Latetitia Griffith: "The may be about a group which does not use violence,but closes themselves off from Dutch norms and values. A group which limits free democratic debate in this way has to be dealt with. The Kabinet reacts lamely as usual. Talking and drinking tea is the proposal. These people don't want to talk, they want nothing to do with Dutch society"

This item is available on the Militant Islam Monitor website, at http://www.militantislammonitor.org/article/id/3208