This item is available on the Militant Islam Monitor website, at http://www.militantislammonitor.org/article/id/2236

Muslims in FL mosque that hosted terrorists and raised money for suicide bombers families worry they will be profiled

August 13, 2006

MIM: The next headline will read, Muslims forsee racial profiling after bombing tommorrow. As usual the foiled bomb plot is all about how it will effect Muslims - although nothing has happened the fact it might is enough reason for them to claim victimhood.

The mosque has received no derogatory calls since the terror plot was revealed, Khatib said.

MIM: But ....

But life in America won't get any easier for Muslims, members said.

MIM: One Muslim woman recounted this horror story and whined about how hard Muslims had it in America disingenuously claiming a woman didnt want to do business with her because of their clothers. Orthodox Jewish women also cover their heads snd wear concealing clothing, the only difference is they dont go around blowing themselves or aircraft up.

Roxanne Berrak, 43, became a Muslim in June 2001. Not long ago, a female customer in the Sarasota retail store where she works wouldn't do business with her because she wore a head covering.

She wonders what will it be like for her after this latest event.

"It's very hard for Muslim women in America because of our clothing and that we cover our heads," Berrak said.

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http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/news/local/15256964.htm

Area Muslims foresee racial profiling after foiled attacks

RICHARD DYMOND

Herald Staff Writer

SARASOTA - Muslims in Sarasota and Bradenton are expressing outrage over the massive terror plot by jihadists in Great Britain.

And they predict that the arrests of 24 British-born Muslims, accused of plotting to destroy 10 aircrafts over the Atlantic, will result in harsher treatment for Muslims in the United States and extra scrutiny of Muslims at U.S. airports - often referred to as racial profiling.

What would the president of the Islamic Society of Sarasota and Bradenton say to the suspects?

"I would ask them, 'What the hell are you up to,' " Samir Khatib said Friday. " 'What can you achieve? Do you realize this is affecting the reputation of Muslims all over the world?' These are the questions I would ask."

Khatib joined other Muslims Friday at the regular 1:30 p.m. prayers at the mosque on Lockwood Ridge Road.

"I feel sad and disappointed for what is happening," said Sultan Kumisbayer, 27, a Muslim from Kazakhstan. "I'm frustrated with it. Those who kill innocent people I don't consider brothers.

"Those who declare jihad for Allah and take lives of those who are not harming them, I don't call brother," Kumisbayer said. "Fight to liberate yourself, OK. But this is not that."

Sofian Abdelaziz Zakkout, director of The American Muslim Association of North America, based in Miami, was visiting the local mosque Friday.

"Killing little children on an airplane, we condemn such acts," Zakkout said. "This is definitely against Islam.

"Muslims in America are condemning it 100 percent."

Khatib lived in Great Britain for 30 years until he recently moved to Venice. He had become used to racial profiling at Heathrow Airport in London, where he was usually detained for 30 minutes because of his last name.

"I didn't resent the special attention," Khatib said. "I understood the man before me in uniform was doing a job. I offered to help him. The more secure the plane is, the happier I am. I don't want to be hurt. Why would I object? It's the way it is."

It would not be unreasonable to expect that American airports could resort to extra attention now to those with Muslim names, appearance or clothing, Khatib said.

"I don't expect less from security, in fact I expect more," Khatib said. "That's why it's called security."

U.S. Airport security for those with Muslim or Arab backgrounds will get tighter, Kumisbayer agreed.

"It will be frustrating, but at the same time understandable," Kumisbayer said.

The mosque has received no derogatory calls since the terror plot was revealed, Khatib said.

But life in America won't get any easier for Muslims, members said.

Roxanne Berrak, 43, became a Muslim in June 2001. Not long ago, a female customer in the Sarasota retail store where she works wouldn't do business with her because she wore a head covering.

She wonders what will it be like for her after this latest event.

"It's very hard for Muslim women in America because of our clothing and that we cover our heads," Berrak said.

Khatib hopes that Americans will hold onto their rational thinking in the midst of the latest crisis.

"When I heard about the events in Britain I felt very upset and disgusted," Khatib said. "But to solve any dispute you have to have understanding. I hope intelligent people will realize there is a good and bad element in all people."

For Muslims, trying to explain to non-Muslims why any Muslims would all come to the same decision to harm strangers under the name of Islam is difficult.

"Islam does not tell its followers to punish people," Khatib said. "Only God does that. Jews, Christians and Muslims all believe that it is not me who punishes. You can't be a Muslim if you differ in that basic philosophy.

"In Islam, if you kill one soul, it's considered unjust," Khatib said. "It's revenge. It's hatred."

Khatib said terrorists have an unbalanced nature that could appear in individuals of other religions and should not reflect negatively on Islam and other Muslims.

"We don't know what makes them tick," Khatib said. "Take Adolph Hitler, he was a Christian. Timothy McVeigh, the Oklahoma bomber, was Christian. Do we say that Christianity is bad because of these two? All faiths have their nuts.

"The important thing now is to all be together," Khatib added. "We have to be able to keeping talking to each other."

Richard Dymond, Herald reporter, can be reached at rdymond@HeraldToday.com or at 708-7917.

"I would ask them, 'What the hell are you up to? What can you achieve?' "

- Samir Khatib, president of Islamic Society of Sarasota and Bradenton

"This gives Americans the total wrong impression of Islam."

- Roxanne Berrak, became a Muslim in June 2001

"I'm frustrated with it. Those who kill innocent people I don't consider brothers."

- Sultan Kumisbayer, 27, a Muslim from Kazakhstan

This item is available on the Militant Islam Monitor website, at http://www.militantislammonitor.org/article/id/2236